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The Effectiveness of UKIP Campaign Advertising

Philip Ammerman |  26 June 2016

 

In two previous articles, I have reviewed why Britain voted “Leave” in the June 23rd Referendum, and what are some reasons the EU succeeds and fails. A picture is worth a thousand words, however, and the UK Independence Party has been one of the most effective parties in terms of creating powerful images that reinforce its message and go viral online.

The UKIP has been extraordinarily effective with the message and the medium. Their posters and adverts have been placed on Tube stations, billboards and buses. Samples follow. All have been taken from the UKIP Facebook page, Twitter Feed and two external sources.

The common themes here are:

  1. The UK has been damaged by EU immigration.

  2. Immigration causes job losses, low wages and competition for housing.

  3. The UK is facing the threat of massive future immigration.

  4. The UK is paying the EU, even though the EU has created these threats.

  5. Voters must vote Leave to “regain control” of their country.

It is interesting to note that the UKIP has been remarkable consistent in its messaging. Some posters from the 2014 Parliamentary Election campaign are included.

It is also interesting to note that virtually all the immigration posters are of extreme cases: refugees marching to Germany or Turkish accession. None of them show the daily reality of immigration in the UK, which I see through the hard-working Lithuanian staff at our office reception in London or the Greek professors and lecturers I know working long hours for very low pay in UK universities.

And this illustrates the power of the message. The UKIP does a brilliant job of appealing to the real or assumed threats faced by British voters on an everyday basis. As I mentioned in my Brexit article on Friday, that daily reality has become very difficult indeed.

Please note that I do not support the UKIP party, nor the messages and means it employs. This article is an objective and independent review of their campaign messaging and advertising.

 

The Breaking Point

UKIP The Breaking Point

Posted on the UKIP Facebook Page, June 16. 2,800 reactions. 1,339 shares. 765 comments.

This poster uses a refugee column marching through central Europe last summer as an effective anchor to the message: “The EU has failed us all. We must break free of the EU and take back control of our borders.”

 

Cameron on Turkey

Cameron on Turkey

Posted on UKIP Facebook Page 14 June. 3,000 reactions. 2,135 shares. 831 comments.

This image reinforces the threat of immigrants, but is not tied to the Referendum.

 

The School Over-Run

UKIP The School Overrun

Posted on the UKIP Facebook Page, 21 June. 1,300 reactions. 634 shares. 164 comments.

This image reinforces the idea that UK public services bear the cost of high immigration, and that immigration is the European Union’s fault.

 

We Send £ 34 million to the EU Every Day

UKIP 34 million to the EU every day

Posted on the UKIP Facebook Page, June 8. 6,000 reactions. 4,692 shares. 337 comments.

This image reinforces the idea that money contributed by the UK to the EU budget should be spent on national spending instead.

 

Reduce Immigration to Reduce Strain on Housing

UKIP Reduce Immigration to Reduce strain on Housing

Posted on the UKIP Facebook Page, June 10. 7,200 reactions. 2,902 shares. 411 comments.

This image makes the connection between high immigration and high housing prices.

 

Which Flag is Yours?

UKIP Which Flag is Yours

Posted on the UKIP Facebook Page, 20 June. 3,800 reactions. 936 shares. 512 comments.

The image of the UK Union Jack contraposed to the EU Flag, with the tag line “It is time to take back control of our country.”

 

David Cameron vs. Nigel Farage

UKIP David Cameron vs Nigel Farage

Posted on the UKIP Facebook Page, 7 June. 191 reactions. 78 shares. 19 comments.

This billboard juxtaposes David Cameron, as representing EU interests, with Nigel Farage as representing UK interests.

 

The EU Isn’t Working

UKIP Twitter the EU isn't Working

Posted on the UKIP Twitter Account (retweet)

Another indictment on the European Union as being a high unemployment zone, and therefore a future risk for the UK via immigration. Also an interesting pun on the concept of the EU being a dysfunctional organisation.

 

Turkish Membership Talks

UKIP Twitter Turkish Membership Talks

Posted on the UKIP Twitter Account (retweet)

A retweet of Nigel Farage’s retweet and comment on Turkish EU Membership talks: again reinforcing the future threat of Turkish immigration to the UK.

 

The UK Funds Turkish Accession Process

UKIP Twitter UK Funding Turkey for Membership Accession

Posted on the UKIP Twitter Account (retweet)

A retweet of Nigel Farage’s retweet and comment on UK assistance helping Turkey prepare for EU Membership talks: again reinforcing the future threat of Turkish immigration to the UK.

 

 

Posters from the UK Parliamentary Election, 22 May 2014

 

It is also interesting to compare the Referendum posters to those from 22 May 2014 Parliamentary Election. UKIP has clearly had a consistent message and very effective visuals.

 

EU Policy at Work

UKIP EU Policy at Work

Sourced from Channel4

This poster shows the long-term theme of immigration as determined by EU policy, and as having a negative impact on employment of British workers.

 

26 million people in Europe are looking for jobs

UKIP 26 million people looking for jobs

Sourced from Channel4

Another poster contrasting high unemployment in Europe with competition for jobs in the UK and, by extension, lower wages in the UK.

 

Your Daily Grind … Funds His Celebrity Lifestyle

UKIP Your Daily Grind

Sourced from Metro.

This poster contrasts the decline in UK living standards with the “celebrity lifestyle” of European Union staff.

 

Who Really Runs this Country?

UKIP Who Really Runs This Country

Sourced from Channel4

Another poster implicating the European Union in the “loss of control” and loss of national sovereignty by the UK.

 

(c) Philip Ammerman, 2016

 

Related Posts

The Apparent and Overstated Death of Europe |  25 June 2016

Thoughts on Brexit |  24 June 2016


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